CategorySport

The Good Karma Hospital review – the TV version of a package holiday

In ITV’s lovely-looking but unchallenging new Sunday night drama, Holby City meets The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Dr Ruby Walker is feeling down. You can tell, she’s wearing an I’m-not-happy face, and there are sad piano chords on the soundtrack, just in case you were in any doubt. It’s not surprising. She works for the NHS, as a junior doctor, in Nottingham; what’s to be happy about? Plus there’s a nasty sister on her case, as well as Jeremy Hunt. Oh, and her boyfriend’s leaving her. I wonder if Amrita Acharia, who plays Doc Walker in The Good Karma Hospital (ITV, Sunday), is getting sad-face help by thinking: hang on, I used to be in Game of bloody Thrones, the biggest show ever, what am I doing in this unchallenging Sunday evening ITV drama? Though, to be fair, she was only a handmaiden in GoT, and sadly strangled after a couple of seasons; here she’s the main event. Continue reading…

A GP’s guide to stocking your medicine cabinet

Most of us have allowed our bathroom cupboards to become cluttered with useless and out-of-date drugs and devices. Here’s what you should have to hand A&E is full to bursting, GPs are stretched to breaking point – there has never been a better time to treat ourselves. But, when you are unwell, the symptoms are usually at their worst in the middle of the night – and that is when you discover that your so-called medicine cabinet is woefully understocked. It’s the equivalent of opening the fridge when you are starving and finding nothing but a row of mouldy condiments. So what’s worth keeping, chucking and buying? Continue reading…

Jack Thorne’s Junkyard: how I turned an adventure playground into a musical

Junk playgrounds had sheer drops, death-defying rope swings and were always being set on fire. The playwright explains why he has written a show about these chaotic spaces and the kids who built them My dad recently retired after 50 years of public service. In that time, he wore many hats: treasurer of this, secretary of that, chairman of this, agitator of that. He was a town planner, teacher, playgroup leader and union organiser. He worked in council offices, community centres, citizens advice bureaux and, most recently, on a roundabout renovation. One thing was a constant: he always worked for the public good. We grew up without much money but were never short when it came to having things of importance thrust into our heads. We went on marches, protests and holidays to union conferences in Blackpool and Bournemouth. He always expected big things of us and was never shy of saying so. Musicians play instruments made out of junk. The cast play the set – and each others’ heads. Every day they get wilder Continue reading…

The next Doctor Who, a black Bond … the pop culture debates that never end

We’re bracing ourselves for months of rumours about who will replace Peter Capaldi in the Tardis. Didn’t we just do this? Whovians will be saddened by the announcement that Peter Capaldi is to retire from his police box at the end of this year. For the rest of us, the story is merely a cue for the reopening of an eternal debate in British pop culture. Soon, long lists of possible candidates for the next Doctor Who will be dredged from BBC2 costume drama leads. Here is a list of nine other questions that crop up again and again in pop culture. Continue reading…

Monday’s best TV: SAS Rogue Warriors, The Fake News Show, The Accused

An exploration of the regiment, and a panel show discusses propaganda. Plus: a raw documentary about a woman charged with child cruelty Opening episode of a series exploring the peculiar origins of the SAS. Lieutenant David Stirling, described by superiors as “irresponsible and unremarkable” was the founder of the regiment which, in 1941, was convened for a series of suicidal missions in the north African desert. Historian and author Ben Macintyre eagerly describes the manoeuvres of this band of eccentrics as their scattershot approach to warfare transmuted into something more measured. Phil Harrison Continue reading…

Quantum Mechanics: A Ladybird Expert Book by Jim Al-Khalili – digested read

‘Planck’s constant is a tiny number. It is even smaller than 1. Wow!’ By the end of the 19th century, many physicists believed there really wasn’t any more to learn about the workings of nature and the properties of matter and radiation. On balance, it might have been easier for everyone if things had stayed that way. Then we could just study Newton and Maxwell and all go home, too. Here’s a picture of an apple landing on Newton’s head. Things changed in 1900 when Max Planck proposed that the energy of electromagnetic radiation was proportional to its frequency. This is known as Planck’s constant which is a tiny number. Even smaller than one. This led Planck to conclude that the radiation had to be lumpy. Continue reading…